The benefits of anti-cellulite products

In my opinion, there’s nothing is more useless in beauty-industry than anti-cellulite products.

I have never met a person who got rid of cellulite because of them. The best that they can do is to make skin a little bit more elastic, dense and moisturized. Actually, any good body creme can do that if you use it. But to make us buy this «any» creme, companies have to make unbelieveable tricks. They give a cream some cheerful and optimistic name, like «Cellulite-off» and juggle words in the description so well that you don’t need to go to circus anymore.

«Eliminates the primary symptoms…», «makes cellulite symptoms less noticeable»… Or this last masterpiece (I think) from a respectable brand Elemis: «Serum with efficent anti-cellulite effect that blocks the appearance of fatty deposits». And below: «Independent clinical research have shown (…) that 92% of women have noticed reduction of cellulite symptoms by more than 6%.

The number of women that have done testing was not mentioned, as usual. Perhaps there were five. Or as much as 15.

And 92% of them is 8 and a half women. And it somehow seemed to them that their cellulite reduced by 6%. What they were drinking and smoking before is a mystery. How they have calculated the the 6% — the history is silent again. How can you assume 6% «effective results» — do not even delve into these reflections because wrinkles  appear on the forehead because of such thoughts. But brand sends these press-releases to magazines. And editors that at first are  too lazy to think because it’s not mentioned at their job description, secondly — have no time to think, thirdly — need something to fill the pages because of deadlines, so they make texts like «new effective and scientifically scientifically proven anti-cellulite product…» Then it’s signed in print. Blessed are those who believe. Amen.

So, against this bleak general background, anti-cellulite products that at least do something are already a blessing, I guess. The one like that came across my hands recently (or I’d better say «across my legs»): Ozo System Legs Cold Cream by Jean Klebert. It’s written vertical on the bottle «anticellulite» and horizontal «for cellulite» (the last is really funny: creme for cellulite is rather bold:)

It includes a lot of menthol oil, camphor and eucalyptus oil and also prickly butcher ‘s broom, chestnut, ivy and calendula herbal extracts. And you know, it’s one of the most efficent products for cooling the tired legs I’ve ever tried. Swelling, and that’s dull «buzz» in the legs, and a sense of gravity — all instantly disappears. It smells like menthol and eucalyptus, right as it should. It’s well absorbed. And it cools like you’ve placed your legs into a freezer.

It’s still unclear what the thing about cellulite is. I guess, just for sales. And moreover, this Ozo System Legs Cold Cream is included into anticellulite line, so that’s why this magic word is written here. As far as I’m concerned, if they stopped playing these games and started to sell this product as leg cooling gel, it would be better, much more honest and more advantageous.

So what do you think, my dearest? Maybe I’m mistaken and «anticellulite» is something more than marketing tool which should be better called «marketing fraud»?

By the way, the gel’s price is around 1 600 rubles. It’s surely on sale online, I’ve never met it at offline shops, but I can be mistaken.





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